Monday, August 5, 2013

Apple Saucin'



The "old apple tree" in our back
yard, that's been here for many
generations, yielded a good
crop of Transparent apples 
this year.
It only blooms every other
year and this is it!

So, I'm saucin' today ....







This tree gives such a wonderful
shade in summer and we almost
lost it a few years ago.
It split with the weight and wind
and the farmer put a bolt 
right through the large trunk
to hold it together and we hoped
for the best.
That was about 4 years ago and so 
far so good.




Transparent Apples (or Harvest Apples
as my Mom called them)
are a very old variety.
My mother always made apple sauce with
these tart tasting beauties.
Because of their thin skin and transparent
colour, there is no need to peel or 
core them before saucing.



Simply quarter and cut
out any bad spots or bruises.
Fill a large Dutch Oven pot
(mine is a 4 qt. pot)
Add 3/4 - 1 Cup of water.
Cook slowly, stirring often,
until the apples are soft 
and mushy (30-40 min.)






Put the cooked apples
through a sieve
pressing gently to
separate the skins and seeds
from the apple sauce.
Discard the skins and seeds.

Sweeten to taste (approx. 1/2 Cup Sugar)
or leave it unsweetened for
use in baking.





When I was growing up
Apple Sauce was
on the Table at each meal.

It was a nice additional side to
pork dinners, pancakes,
fried potatoes, or on it's
own as a dessert with
a generous sprinkle of
cinnamon.







Till next time ..... enjoying the remainder of this Civic Holiday Weekend.








9 comments:

  1. An interesting discussion today. I am amazed that your husband bolted the tree back together. My husband thinks it was an inspired idea. One thing is certain, it could not have been hurt any more. I love applesauce, but we seldom eat it. Probably a good homemade one would make all the difference. Enjoy yours!

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  2. My mum always had her own apple sauce too. I miss it. I didn't make any last year, but should this year. We have about five trees, of unknown parentage, but they make good sauce!

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  3. Reminds me of summer time at my Grandmother's. She had two transparent apple trees in her back yard and she would make pies for the freezer and loads of the best tasting apple sauce as well. Her secret ingredient, marsh-mellows for sweetening. That apple sauce was so creamy and not too sweet.

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  4. Growing up in San Diego no one had apple trees so apple sauce was never home made. When I went away to college in Oregon I was amazed to find home made apple sauce on the table everywhere and apples even left rotting on the ground around trees!

    I have yet to make my own apple sauce but I will share my favorite fast dessert treat: pour a bit of French Vanilla coffee creamer (the one made with real cream ) into the sauce! Add a square of Graham cracker if you wish. Very low calorie but such a treat.

    By the way, we had orange trees everywhere growing up. French vanilla creamer added to orange juice equals Orange Julius!

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  5. I have never made apple sauce, but yours looks delicious!

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  6. I wonder if my tree is a transparent apple tree. I'm afraid I have no inspiration for the apples on it this year. I still have the applesauce I made from the apples last August. I'm really happy to hear that I can sauce them with this easier method!!
    This is an off year for my fruit crop labors!

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  7. There is nothing like a transparent tree and it's memories. Yes, I had to pick them up every day....and we made applesauce. We had applesauce at each meal also. I've made my apple perishky for the winter and froze it...and lots more apples for apple crumble.

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  8. On the lake property, the part owned by my step-dad, there is fallen apple tree and it still bears fruit. I guess they do not die too easily. Your applesauce looks so yummy and what a good idea to have it around all the time.

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  9. Transparents and apple sauce are also a memory of my growing up as well. Those apple trees can take a lot! Glad it's still producing for your enjoyment.

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